PUERTO RICO – A LEECH PARADISE

Imagine an offer you can’t refuse. No gun pointed to your head, but just plain old capitalism.Image result for leech definition A solution to a so-called insurmountable problem is in your grasp, little or no strings attached, no, this is not a deal with the devil, but a viable way out of a quagmire that you put yourself in and you refuse to sign on. Questions would arise why you walked away from the  deal of the century. But we know the answers; you didn’t sign on for political reasons. And that is what got you into the mess in the  first place. YOU ARE THE EQUIVALENT OF A LEECH. YOU ARE A BLOOD SUCKER, YOU ALWAYS HAVE BEEN AND YOU WILL NEVER BE ANYTHING ELSE. YOU ARE PUERTO RICO.

A backdrop: Puerto Rico began defaulting on its debts two years ago, seeking to avoid Draconian budget cuts officials said would deal another blow to an already shrinking economy. With nearly half of its 3.4 million residents living in poverty, the government sought protection from creditors in May.

The details to the agreement you refused provide insight on your thinking. And what was that proposal? PREPA, the power company that once was, is bankrupt – kaput; they have brought this on themselves, this was suicide by default; no, Hurricane Maria did not pour more water on their parade – they were drowning in their own debt, plus years of mismanagement brought them to the abyss.

Last year Puerto Rico suffered a large-scale blackout that cut power to half the island’s residents. A major power plant caught fire, damaging two large transmission sites. Prepa’s power infrastructure is dangerously out of date, reliant on dirty and inefficient oil generators for 45 percent of its energy production, compared with a 4 percent national average. Yet Puerto Rican energy costs are high, with residents paying more for electricity than Americans in any state except Hawaii. High prices and bad service are just two reasons why Puerto Rico has been losing jobs and people for a decade.

Investors did not examine Prepa’s finances before helping it go broke, though performing due diligence would have been easy: in 2013, the last year that it issued long-term bonds, Prepa warned investors in writing that it had lost money for four years in a row. “These losses reflect the continuation of a historical trend of net losses,” it added, noting that the amount it owed—then $10.8 billion—exceeded its assets by nearly $1 billion. “If this trend were to continue, the Authority’s ability to fund its operations and finance its capital program”—that is, investments in better power assets—“could be negatively impacted,” it warned potential lenders.

Because bondholders let Prepa stay in business for so long while deferring maintenance, the power company needed $4.7 billion in infrastructure upgrades even before Maria hit. To its credit, it had finally begun to explore how to be more efficient. Yet bondholders clung to the fiction that the company could repay much of its debt. To avert bankruptcy, bondholders had already agreed to 15 percent losses on the money Prepa owed; they also granted the company a debt-payment extension. It wasn’t enough.

After Maria’s emergency phase passes, Prepa must rebuild its permanent assets. Because the company was under-insured—it self-insured its distribution and transmission assets, with only $90 million set aside for that purpose—Washington will likely provide much of the money to do that. The feds should work with Puerto Rico to ensure that Prepa rebuilds effectively, especially through partnerships with successful power companies from the U.S. mainland.

Along with Puerto Rico itself, Prepa was already on the verge of bankruptcy.  And in July, the power authority filed for insolvency under the custom-tailored bankruptcy law that President Obama signed last year. The company reported $11.4 billion in debt, including $8 billion in long-term bonds. Much of this debt is held by investors from the U.S. mainland, lured by tax-exempt investing incentives.

Maria did one thing right, it exposed the vulnerability of Puerto Rico and laid bare the leeches that make up the majority of its populace. Maria did a superb job of getting this latter point across. Congress created a new board to oversee the restructuring of Puerto Rico itself, Promesea; the new kid on the block, a stalwart with a socialist mentality, with a mindset to screw the existing bondholders of Puerto Rico and the debt holders of PREPA. In other words they were set up to rule and set rules and break contracts and violate the Constitution. They were the law West of the Pecos.

Remember, Puerto Rico laready turned down an offer to good to refuse. Image result for law west of the pecosPrepa bondholders offered to exchange $1 billion in debt for $850 million and $1 billion in new cash. REJECTED out of hand. Governor Rossello, the political lackey to say the least, has more excuses for failure than the opioids filling the veins of its citizens.

Image result for opioids

In the power struggle, no pun intended, between Governor Rossello and Promesea, the governor has won so far. Bonuses are being paid for Christmas, no layoffs, no restructuring. The bottom line here is clear as the waters off the coast of Puerto Rico once were, Puerto Rico is run by a dictator welfare socialist governor who will not accept private capital but wants the Feds to hand over $94,000,000,000 (billion) to him so he can do with it what he pleases.

TELL YOUR CONGRESSMAN AND SENATOR THAT PUERTO RICO IS A THE MOTHER OF ALL LEECHES AND THEY CAN GO STRAIGHT TO PURGATORY!

BEGGARS

Puerto Rico this week requested $94 billion in immediate aid to recover from hurricanes Irma and Maria, which left most of the 3.4 million residents without power. The biggest share of the funds, $31 billion, were to be used to rebuild homes, with another $18 billion requested for the electric utility, Governor Ricardo Rossello said in a letter to President Donald Trump released Monday.  

No preconceived notions here, but what gets our goat is the amount of money Puerto Rico demands from mainland taxpayers;  $100,000,000,000. Side note, Puerto Ricans don’t pay Federal Income Tax.  A back of the envelope calculation computes to $10,000 per individual – counting children. That is on top of the $50,000,000,000 we send annually to the island. Sending good money after bad does not compute, it never did.

American Renaissance

Alex Witoslawski, American Renaissance, October 4, 2017

Puerto Ricans are blaming President Trump for the fact that two weeks after Hurricane Maria, their island is still a mess: power outages, flooding, fuel shortages, spotty cell service, washed out bridges, roads blocked by fallen trees. But who is really to blame for the island’s paralysis?

Consider this: Puerto Rico has a population of only 3.4 million but their elected government has run up a debt of over $70 billion and pension obligations of $50 billion. That’s more than $35,294 per resident and over 100 percent of GDP. Puerto Rico has already defaultedon a $58 million bond payment in 2016, due to its already-high taxes and unwillingness to cut government spending. It fell into crushing debt despite the $21 billion annually the island receives in aid from the United States, much of it spent on welfare programs such as Head Start, public housing, and food stamps. That’s over $6,000 per capita in federal welfare that the islanders consume. And due to the special status of the island, Puerto Ricans do not even pay federal income tax.

Borrowing and US handouts sustained the welfare habits of the people, but Puerto Rico left its infrastructure embarrassingly outdated. According to the Los Angeles Times, Puerto Rico’s electrical grid is so starved of physical and human capital that it suffers from power outages four-to-five times the average—even in good weather. Puerto Rico also failed to invest in infrastructure to protect against flooding. The island has few floodwalls and dangerously weak dams—a dam on the island cracked following the hurricane, forcing the evacuation of more than 70,000 people.

These problems were foreseeable and preventable, but liberals and Puerto Rican officials are blaming Donald Trump. Perhaps he is being too nice. Puerto Rico created its own problems; why should we be on the hook for them?

(Credit Image: © Erik Mcgregor/Pacific Press via ZUMA Wire)

After acquisition by the United States following the Spanish-American War in 1898, the island’s residents never integrated with Americans culturally, linguistically, or racially. Puerto Ricans are culturally Hispanic, racially a mix of Spanish colonists, African slaves and Taino natives, and most of them don’t speak any English. They may technically be United States citizens but they share little common history or ancestry with Americans and are clearly a nation that developed separately from our own. And what could indicate a clearer sense of alienation from the United States than the fact that Puerto Rico has its own Olympic team?

Puerto Ricans, meanwhile, have many gripes with what they perceive as their American overlords. For example, even before this latest hurricane-induced crisis, a major problem for Puerto Rico was their inability to conduct trade independently. According to U.S. law, goods must travel between Puerto Rican and mainland American ports on American-made vessels before they are exported or imported. This weakens Puerto Rico’s economy.

The best solution would be to let Puerto Rico become an independent country, free to make its own decisions and responsible for its own problems. This could be done amicably and generously. Since we pay the island tens of billions of dollars every year in welfare payments, we could easily pay off their debt and give them post-hurricane humanitarian aid as incentives to independence.

We could also offer remigration cash incentives for Puerto Ricans living in America who are willing to give up their U.S. citizenship and move to the island. This would not only be an opportunity for the Puerto Rican diaspora in the United States to reunite with their people, but also a great way to reverse the brain-drain. Over the past century, many of the more intelligent and hard-working Puerto Ricans moved to the mainland for better opportunities. The 2010 U.S. Census counted the number of Puerto Ricans living in America at 4.6 million, making it America’s second-largest Hispanic group after Mexicans. This represents a tremendous loss in cultural, economic, and human capital for the island.

Finally, we could offer military protection and economic advice for a couple decades. Chile took economic advice from free-market economists from the University of Chicago and the economy boomed. With the right advice and incentives, Puerto Rico could experience a similar economic rebound.

Separation would come with an expensive up-front price tag for us, but it would save Americans money in the long run and would give Puerto Rico full control over its culture and destiny.

CLICK HERE – Trump tweets that “federal aid won’t last forever.”

THE LATEST NEWS – previous post

The head of an international engineering firm in Puerto Rico said in an editorial Saturday that when the time came to send 50 of his engineers to help in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, he bypassed local officials and went straight to FEMA.

The reason, said Jorge Rodriguez, the CEO of PACIV, in an editorial in the New York Post, is that “for the last 30 years, the Puerto Rican government has been completely inept at handling regular societal needs, so I just don’t see it functioning in a crisis like this one.”

Puerto Ricans elected a new governor last November but, Rodriguez charged, he was inexperienced and had never been responsible for a budget.

Gov. Ricardo Rossello cannot exactly count on those around him either, Rodriguez asserted.

“His entire administration is totally inexperienced and they have no clue how to handle a crisis of this magnitude,” said Rodriguez, who has a graduate business degree from Harvard Business School and was named a “Most Distinguished Graduate” by the University of Puerto Rico.   

The WARNING FROM MR.Rodriguez who also had a word of caution for the U.S. Congress: “Watch out what relief funds you approve and let our local government handle. Don’t let the Puerto Rican government play the victim and fool youThey have no clue what they are doing, and I worry that they will mishandle anything that comes their way.”

AND WE ARE GOING TO POUR GOOD MONEY INTO PUERTO RICO!   THE LAZY GOOD FOR NOTHING WELFARE LEACHES WILL BLOW IT LIKE THEY HAVE FOR THE PAST CENTURY!  THIS IS THE WELFARE ISLAND. 

Hey Guys (this includes Girls-no offense, but guys is now a generic term) do you, a taxpayer, want to pay for a stranger’s new house ? Bigger and better than the one you own or rent?  Yeah, we are talking about those poor souls who lived in shanties down there in Puerto Rico. The ones with no flood insurance; to top it off 60% had no wind insurance. In the great majority of cases these houses (pmuds to say the least) were worth, maybe if you stretch it, $8000-$10,000. You have seen them before on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico – you say you don’t know what a pmud is, for heaven’s sake it is a dump spelled backward.

Well, let’s get to the point! The welfare island territory has leached off us long enough – now is their time to carry the water.  We are sick and tired of being being sucked dry. They are clamoring for us to give them new houses for free, yes those who had theirs destroyed by Maria. These former homeowners are surging into FEMA’s offices. Of course they have plenty of time on their hand, none work. They rely on you, the taxpayer, for money.  We are talking about the drug and gangster infested island. Audacity. They are also DEMANDING RESPECT. People with no job, but oh yeah, they are on SS disability, food stamps, welfare, medicare and whatever program they can suck dry. You don’t believe us? And the mayor of San Juan, she too opened her big fat trap. Trump had none of it. 

Flag of Puerto Rico.svgPuerto Rico’s bloated government also bears much of the blame. Around 30% of the territory’s jobs are in the public sector. Among other things, a big and coddled bureaucracy undermines Puerto Rico’s educational achievements in two ways. First, nearly half those on the education department’s payroll are not teachers; quality has fallen because of low accountability and mismanagement.

The Urban Dictionary defines LEACH; is a type of person who does their best to suck your personal wealth out of you, without actually causing pain, but just extreme annoyance after you notice it is happaning. Trump voters are sick and tired of being leached to death. Aren’t you?

As he walked through Aguadilla’s town hall recently, Mr Méndez, the mayor,  boasted about each employee’s university or graduate-school credentials as he introduced them. The trouble, he says, is that “All they want to do is find security only. They have no ambition...Everybody wants to work for the government.” Manuel Reyes, of the Puerto Rico Manufacturers Association, also sees little hope that the government’s role will shrink. “There is no light at the end of the tunnel,” he says, “because we are still in denial.”

The federal government spent more than $2 billion to provide food stamps to residents of Puerto Rico in 2012, up to 25 percent of which is untraceable because it is distributed in cash and there is “no way to verify that funds are spent on food,” according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The funds are used to supply more than one-third of the population of Puerto Rico with food stamps. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Nutrition Assistance Program (NAP) for Puerto Rico, an unincorporated territory of the United States, received $2 billion in Nutrition Assistance Block Grants in fiscal year 2012.  Folks this was back in 2012, today it is approaching $3 billion dollars. Why work when you can eat like the burger King.

Unemployment: 48% of those eligible to work don’t, counting those that don’t seek work the figure explodes to 55%. One in six working-age men in Puerto Rico are claiming disability benefits and the figure is expect to rise to 12% because of Maria. People from the Dominican Republic do many of the jobs in Puerto Rico that pay too little to attract the locals because the huge amount of government payments they collect while on the dole. What do Puerto Rico’s men do all day? Some get into trouble. But many others hang out in pleasant places that require little money, such as beaches, shopping malls and the armchairs in Borders bookstores. They also watch plenty of television. Satellite dishes sprout from many rooftops. People always have money for that bill.

PUERTO RICO wins the Leach award hands down. Advice to President Trump, “do not give them one red cent.” The government is defunct, the people who live there rely on the United States for handouts. They have reneged on $125 billion in debt. Their economy never was functional, relying on tax breaks to bribe mainland companies – for the most part big pharma – to relocated there. They determined their fate; they shall have to live with it. Estimates of damage are close to $100 billion, why bail them out? For the United States taxpayer this is a travesty. To bail out a bunch of low lifes on social security disability is an affront to those who work, to the American taxpayer. The highest percentage of Social Security disability cases are in Puerto Rico. Now we expect a million more (because of depression) to apply for disability. IT IS A WAY OF LIFE IN PUERTO RICO. Live high, but don’t work, on other peoples money. READ ON FOLKS AND YOU WILL BEGIN TO COMPREHEND THE REAL SITUATION IN PUERTO RICO.

Puerto Ricans who can’t speak English qualify as disabled for Social Security

Hundreds of Puerto Rico’s residents qualified for federal disability benefits in recent years because they lacked fluency in English, according to government auditors. The Social Security Administration’s inspector general questioned the policy this month in light of the fact that Spanish is the predominant language in the U.S. territory. Under Social Security regulations, individuals are considered less employable in the United States if they can’t speak English, regardless of their work experience or level of education. AND THAT IS NOT ALL!

Puerto Rico is red meat, let the vultures come in and devour it. Clean it up and make it what it can be. But no this won’t happen because Big Government will get involved continuing their largess. LET THEM SINK OR SWIMWhy should the mainland BAIL them out?

According to the Consolidated Federal Funds Report compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau, Puerto Rico has received more than $21 billion annually in federal aid from the United States. A substantial portion of this amount is earmarked for public welfare, including funding educational programs (such as Head Start), subsidized housing programs (such as (Section 8 and public housing projects), and a food stampsystem called the Nutrition Assistance for Puerto Rico program.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a federal entitlement program that provides cash assistance to low-income aged, blind, and disabled individuals. Individuals receiving SSI benefits are eligible for Medicaid coverage in all states except “section 209(b)” states, which have opted to use their more restrictive 1972 criteria in determining Medicaid eligibility for SSI recipients. Section 209(b) of the 1972 amendments to the Social Security Act allowed states the option of continuing to use their own eligibility criteria in determining Medicaid eligibility for the elderly and disabled rather than extending Medicaid coverage to all of those individuals who qualify for SSI benefits. As of 2001, eleven states (Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Virginia) had elected the “209(b)” option to apply their 1972 eligibility criteria to aged or disabled individuals receiving SSI benefits for purposes of determining Medicaid

PUERTO RICO – FOOD STAMP NATION -previous post

One third – 33% of Puerto Rico’s population is on food stamps costing the United States over $2 billion per year.  Puerto Rico had a higher public assistance participation rate (5.9 percent) than the national average (2.9 percent), this means that twice as many per capita receive welfare. For those who stay, rich welfare benefits provide a disincentive to work. A household of three can receive $1,743 per month in food stamps, Medicaid, utility subsidies and welfare compared to minimum-wage take-home pay of $1,159. Employers are required to provide 15 days of vacation and 12 sick days annually and a $600 Christmas bonus. Government employees make up a quarter of the island’s workforce.

A more appropriate name should be Puerto Welfare.

PUERTO RICO THE SOCIALIST PARADISE OF THE CARIBBEAN DROWNING IN DEBT

The Greek debacle has been the focus of late on its on again-off again debt restructuring, but that doesn’t mean that the troubles in Puerto Rico are playing second fiddle. Puerto Rico is on the hook for close to $100 billion. That is a boat load of pina coladas. SoBe Smooth Pina Colada Drink - 20-Fl. Oz. Bottles (Pack of 12)Just in case you haven’t been initiated in the Puerto Rico way of doing business we bring you their number one life saver, welfare and social security.  Puerto Rico is a disability fraud paradiseThe top 10 U.S. zip codes tied to people receiving disability benefits, nine are in Puerto Rico. Flag of Puerto Rico

The sharks are circling the waters in the hope of default if and when it happens. The rich island has a dark journey ahead, tourism is in the tank, the economy is in a perpetual depression, drugs are rampant and most of all the government will not do what needs to be done; cut bait.

But Puerto Rico is part of the United States and is a metaphor for liberal bastions like Illinois and Connecticut, both drowning  the sea of debt. Utmost on the minds of the Puerto Rican is not the rising sea levels, but their share of the islands IOU’s. By the way, in case you didn’t notice, Puerto Rico has a population similar to Connecticut, 3,5 million or simply put a debt of $22,000 for each of its citizens. And true to form the Commonwealth’s economy has slowly reached the point of no return being sucked down by a giant whirlpool, even Captain Nemo can’t save this one.Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne

PUERTO RICO – THANKS MARIA FOR EXPOSING THE WELFARE ISLAND

Who’s to Blame for the Mess in Puerto Rico?

American Renaissance

Alex Witoslawski, American Renaissance, October 4, 2017

Not Donald Trump.

Puerto Ricans are blaming President Trump for the fact that two weeks after Hurricane Maria, their island is still a mess: power outages, flooding, fuel shortages, spotty cell service, washed out bridges, roads blocked by fallen trees. But who is really to blame for the island’s paralysis?

Consider this: Puerto Rico has a population of only 3.4 million but their elected government has run up a debt of over $70 billion and pension obligations of $50 billion. That’s more than $35,294 per resident and over 100 percent of GDP. Puerto Rico has already defaultedon a $58 million bond payment in 2016, due to its already-high taxes and unwillingness to cut government spending. It fell into crushing debt despite the $21 billion annually the island receives in aid from the United States, much of it spent on welfare programs such as Head Start, public housing, and food stamps. That’s over $6,000 per capita in federal welfare that the islanders consume. And due to the special status of the island, Puerto Ricans do not even pay federal income tax.

Borrowing and US handouts sustained the welfare habits of the people, but Puerto Rico left its infrastructure embarrassingly outdated. According to the Los Angeles Times, Puerto Rico’s electrical grid is so starved of physical and human capital that it suffers from power outages four-to-five times the average—even in good weather. Puerto Rico also failed to invest in infrastructure to protect against flooding. The island has few floodwalls and dangerously weak dams—a dam on the island cracked following the hurricane, forcing the evacuation of more than 70,000 people.

These problems were foreseeable and preventable, but liberals and Puerto Rican officials are blaming Donald Trump. Perhaps he is being too nice. Puerto Rico created its own problems; why should we be on the hook for them?

(Credit Image: © Erik Mcgregor/Pacific Press via ZUMA Wire)

After acquisition by the United States following the Spanish-American War in 1898, the island’s residents never integrated with Americans culturally, linguistically, or racially. Puerto Ricans are culturally Hispanic, racially a mix of Spanish colonists, African slaves and Taino natives, and most of them don’t speak any English. They may technically be United States citizens but they share little common history or ancestry with Americans and are clearly a nation that developed separately from our own. And what could indicate a clearer sense of alienation from the United States than the fact that Puerto Rico has its own Olympic team?

Puerto Ricans, meanwhile, have many gripes with what they perceive as their American overlords. For example, even before this latest hurricane-induced crisis, a major problem for Puerto Rico was their inability to conduct trade independently. According to U.S. law, goods must travel between Puerto Rican and mainland American ports on American-made vessels before they are exported or imported. This weakens Puerto Rico’s economy.

The best solution would be to let Puerto Rico become an independent country, free to make its own decisions and responsible for its own problems. This could be done amicably and generously. Since we pay the island tens of billions of dollars every year in welfare payments, we could easily pay off their debt and give them post-hurricane humanitarian aid as incentives to independence.

We could also offer remigration cash incentives for Puerto Ricans living in America who are willing to give up their U.S. citizenship and move to the island. This would not only be an opportunity for the Puerto Rican diaspora in the United States to reunite with their people, but also a great way to reverse the brain-drain. Over the past century, many of the more intelligent and hard-working Puerto Ricans moved to the mainland for better opportunities. The 2010 U.S. Census counted the number of Puerto Ricans living in America at 4.6 million, making it America’s second-largest Hispanic group after Mexicans. This represents a tremendous loss in cultural, economic, and human capital for the island.

Finally, we could offer military protection and economic advice for a couple decades. Chile took economic advice from free-market economists from the University of Chicago and the economy boomed. With the right advice and incentives, Puerto Rico could experience a similar economic rebound.

Separation would come with an expensive up-front price tag for us, but it would save Americans money in the long run and would give Puerto Rico full control over its culture and destiny.

CLICK HERE – Trump tweets that “federal aid won’t last forever.”

OBAMA’S ONCE INVISIBLE ARMY TAKES TO THE STREETS

There is no need to rehash Obama’s past comments concerning White attacks against Blacks. Beside Eric Holder, then the attorney general, who failed to indict “The New Black Panther Party for harassing voters at a polling station. Obama, weighed in time and time again with his biased comments which were surreptitiously meant to inflame the Black community. The Trayvon Martin incident proved to be the highlight of Obama’s inflammatory rhetoric.

On the night of February 26, 2012, in Sanford, Florida, United States, George Zimmerman fatally shot Trayvon Martin, a 17-year-old African American high school student. Zimmerman, a 28-year-old mixed race Hispanic man, was the neighborhood watch coordinator for his gated community where Martin was visiting his relatives at the time of the shooting. Zimmerman shot Martin, who was unarmed, during an altercation between the two.

Zimmerman was charged with Martin’s murder but acquitted at trial on self-defense grounds. The incident was reviewed by the Department of Justice for potential civil rights violations, but no additional charges were filed, citing insufficient evidence.

Obama’s comments on the incident: “You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son.  Another way of saying that is Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago.  And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there’s a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it’s important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn’t go away.

There are very few African American men in this country who haven’t had the experience of being followed when they were shopping in a department store.  That includes me.  There are very few African American men who haven’t had the experience of walking across the street and hearing the locks click on the doors of cars.  That happens to me — at least before I was a senator.  There are very few African Americans who haven’t had the experience of getting on an elevator and a woman clutching her purse nervously and holding her breath until she had a chance to get off.  That happens often.”

Running through Obama’s comments one sees the innuendo. This is a strategy that he employs in order to lessen the impact of his own internal biases and hate for America. The double speak is not easy to digest for the true patriot because of the hidden racist script which brings up the race card time and time again. This is what Holder and Obama set out to do. Empower the Black Community with words that turn into action.

Note that the majority of Blacks, if they had their say, do not agree with Obama. But they are prohibited from speaking out for fear of retribution. America today has seen the evolution of the Black Community into the main stream. Those who did not evolve into the mainstream way of thinking and resorted to violence, drugs and delinquency are a literal Black eye on those who succeeded in America. Detroit, the quintessential example, the place where 700,000 individuals moved from the motor city to the suburbs; most of them Black. They fled the sewer pit of drugs, violence and gangbangers. Note that the Democrats still treat the Blacks as if they were slaves picking cotton and cane.

Like Antifa, Black extremists are now a growing threat. They to have been impregnated with the socialist virus; an incurable disease know to be the worst of all. The Antifa community resorts to violence in all respects; reminiscent of the Puerto Rican Nationalist bombers seeking statehood.

Four men were killed and 43 persons were injured on January 25, 1975 when a dynamite powered fragmentation bomb, reportedly planted by an underground Puerto Rican group, exploded and spewed nails and other shrapnel through historic Fraunces Tavern and an exclusive dining club in the Wall Street district.

Deafened by the blast and covered with plaster dust and other debris from fallen walls and ceilings, most of the survivors staggered out to meet other casualties – passersby hurt by flying glass or by the concussion of the explosion.

Even as the dazed and screaming victims, one of them with an arm torn off, were being carried away, the FALN – Fuerzas Armadas de Liberacion Nacional Puertoriquena (Armed Forces of Puerto Rican National Liberation) – telephoned the Associated Press and gloated that one of its agents had planted the explosive device.

Our message is to be aware of the threat we face; underground extremists planning their next step. ISIS is small potatoes compared to the ANTIFA threat. Like the gangs MS-13 has spawned, ANTIFA is slowly recruiting members in all fifty states.

THE PUERTO RICO AFFAIR CONTINUES

This past week President Trump weighed in on the Puerto Rico debt situation. He said that the debt was worthless. Telling  the truth is hard to digest for bondholders, but it is what it is. For the likes of us, we can’t imagine who or what will ever pay back the billions of debt owed by the citizens of Puerto Rico. For heavens sake they are takers not givers; so debtors, kiss your paper goodbye – you can use it for wallpaper or toilet paper, they may be a better use. Puerto Rico has been mismanaged for years by using other peoples money. Why did they ever lend to them is beyond us. And the bond insurers, what were they thinking; beats us.

The best bet here is move forward, bring in the ‘dozers and level the place. Much of the shanty towns have seen total destruction because of lack of building codes and the building of illegal houses. Would you expect anything less. Farmers have seen their crops devastated by the cane. Suddenly, many Puerto Ricans are having to improvise to get by. Maria’s destruction is expected to worsen both. The island could lose 400,000 residents this year, dropping to 3 million. That will lead to steep revenue losses, further draining Puerto Rico’s ability to pay its obligations.Image result for bulldozer

Don’t forget 40% of their debt is owned by locals. Cancelling the debt will be a double whammy. Moving forward is the only way, but expect the Federal Government to throw more money into the wind. As of now, according to those in the know,  the rebuilding will take years. However, in the end, expect the capitalists to boat in, scoop up properties as a cheap price and then rebuild; making Puerto Rico better than ever.

THE WELFARE ISLAND

THE LATEST NEWS

The head of an international engineering firm in Puerto Rico said in an editorial Saturday that when the time came to send 50 of his engineers to help in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, he bypassed local officials and went straight to FEMA.

The reason, said Jorge Rodriguez, the CEO of PACIV, in an editorial in the New York Post, is that “for the last 30 years, the Puerto Rican government has been completely inept at handling regular societal needs, so I just don’t see it functioning in a crisis like this one.”

Puerto Ricans elected a new governor last November but, Rodriguez charged, he was inexperienced and had never been responsible for a budget.

Gov. Ricardo Rossello cannot exactly count on those around him either, Rodriguez asserted.

“His entire administration is totally inexperienced and they have no clue how to handle a crisis of this magnitude,” said Rodriguez, who has a graduate business degree from Harvard Business School and was named a “Most Distinguished Graduate” by the University of Puerto Rico.   

The WARNING FROM MR.Rodriguez who also had a word of caution for the U.S. Congress: “Watch out what relief funds you approve and let our local government handle. Don’t let the Puerto Rican government play the victim and fool you. They have no clue what they are doing, and I worry that they will mishandle anything that comes their way.”

AND WE ARE GOING TO POUR GOOD MONEY INTO PUERTO RICO!   THE LAZY GOOD FOR NOTHING WELFARE LEACHES WILL BLOW IT LIKE THEY HAVE FOR THE PAST CENTURY!  THIS IS THE WELFARE ISLAND. 

Hey Guys (this includes Girls-no offense, but guys is now a generic term) do you, a taxpayer, want to pay for a stranger’s new house ? Bigger and better than the one you own or rent?  Yeah, we are talking about those poor souls who lived in shanties down there in Puerto Rico. The ones with no flood insurance; to top it off 60% had no wind insurance. In the great majority of cases these houses (pmuds to say the least) were worth, maybe if you stretch it, $8000-$10,000. You have seen them before on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico – you say you don’t know what a pmud is, for heaven’s sake it is a dump spelled backward.

Well, let’s get to the point! The welfare island territory has leached off us long enough – now is their time to carry the water.  We are sick and tired of being being sucked dry. They are clamoring for us to give them new houses for free, yes those who had theirs destroyed by Maria. These former homeowners are surging into FEMA’s offices. Of course they have plenty of time on their hand, none work. They rely on you, the taxpayer, for money.  We are talking about the drug and gangster infested island. Audacity. They are also DEMANDING RESPECT. People with no job, but oh yeah, they are on SS disability, food stamps, welfare, medicare and whatever program they can suck dry. You don’t believe us? And the mayor of San Juan, she too opened her big fat trap. Trump had none of it. 

Flag of Puerto Rico.svgPuerto Rico’s bloated government also bears much of the blame. Around 30% of the territory’s jobs are in the public sector. Among other things, a big and coddled bureaucracy undermines Puerto Rico’s educational achievements in two ways. First, nearly half those on the education department’s payroll are not teachers; quality has fallen because of low accountability and mismanagement.

The Urban Dictionary defines LEACH; is a type of person who does their best to suck your personal wealth out of you, without actually causing pain, but just extreme annoyance after you notice it is happaning. Trump voters are sick and tired of being leached to death. Aren’t you?

As he walked through Aguadilla’s town hall recently, Mr Méndez, the mayor,  boasted about each employee’s university or graduate-school credentials as he introduced them. The trouble, he says, is that “All they want to do is find security only. They have no ambition...Everybody wants to work for the government.” Manuel Reyes, of the Puerto Rico Manufacturers Association, also sees little hope that the government’s role will shrink. “There is no light at the end of the tunnel,” he says, “because we are still in denial.”  

The federal government spent more than $2 billion to provide food stamps to residents of Puerto Rico in 2012, up to 25 percent of which is untraceable because it is distributed in cash and there is “no way to verify that funds are spent on food,” according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The funds are used to supply more than one-third of the population of Puerto Rico with food stamps. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Nutrition Assistance Program (NAP) for Puerto Rico, an unincorporated territory of the United States, received $2 billion in Nutrition Assistance Block Grants in fiscal year 2012.  Folks this was back in 2012, today it is approaching $3 billion dollars. Why work when you can eat like the burger King.

Unemployment: 48% of those eligible to work don’t, counting those that don’t seek work the figure explodes to 55%. One in six working-age men in Puerto Rico are claiming disability benefits and the figure is expect to rise to 12% because of Maria. People from the Dominican Republic do many of the jobs in Puerto Rico that pay too little to attract the locals because the huge amount of government payments they collect while on the dole. What do Puerto Rico’s men do all day? Some get into trouble. But many others hang out in pleasant places that require little money, such as beaches, shopping malls and the armchairs in Borders bookstores. They also watch plenty of television. Satellite dishes sprout from many rooftops. People always have money for that bill.

PUERTO RICO wins the Leach award hands down. Advice to President Trump, “do not give them one red cent.” The government is defunct, the people who live there rely on the United States for handouts. They have reneged on $125 billion in debt. Their economy never was functional, relying on tax breaks to bribe mainland companies – for the most part big pharma – to relocated there. They determined their fate; they shall have to live with it. Estimates of damage are close to $100 billion, why bail them out? For the United States taxpayer this is a travesty. To bail out a bunch of low lifes on social security disability is an affront to those who work, to the American taxpayer. The highest percentage of Social Security disability cases are in Puerto Rico. Now we expect a million more (because of depression) to apply for disability. IT IS A WAY OF LIFE IN PUERTO RICO. Live high, but don’t work, on other peoples money. READ ON FOLKS AND YOU WILL BEGIN TO COMPREHEND THE REAL SITUATION IN PUERTO RICO.

Puerto Ricans who can’t speak English qualify as disabled for Social Security

Hundreds of Puerto Rico’s residents qualified for federal disability benefits in recent years because they lacked fluency in English, according to government auditors. The Social Security Administration’s inspector general questioned the policy this month in light of the fact that Spanish is the predominant language in the U.S. territory. Under Social Security regulations, individuals are considered less employable in the United States if they can’t speak English, regardless of their work experience or level of education. AND THAT IS NOT ALL!

Puerto Rico is red meat, let the vultures come in and devour it. Clean it up and make it what it can be. But no this won’t happen because Big Government will get involved continuing their largess. LET THEM SINK OR SWIM. Why should the mainland BAIL them out?

According to the Consolidated Federal Funds Report compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau, Puerto Rico has received more than $21 billion annually in federal aid from the United States. A substantial portion of this amount is earmarked for public welfare, including funding educational programs (such as Head Start), subsidized housing programs (such as (Section 8 and public housing projects), and a food stampsystem called the Nutrition Assistance for Puerto Rico program.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a federal entitlement program that provides cash assistance to low-income aged, blind, and disabled individuals. Individuals receiving SSI benefits are eligible for Medicaid coverage in all states except “section 209(b)” states, which have opted to use their more restrictive 1972 criteria in determining Medicaid eligibility for SSI recipients. Section 209(b) of the 1972 amendments to the Social Security Act allowed states the option of continuing to use their own eligibility criteria in determining Medicaid eligibility for the elderly and disabled rather than extending Medicaid coverage to all of those individuals who qualify for SSI benefits. As of 2001, eleven states (Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Virginia) had elected the “209(b)” option to apply their 1972 eligibility criteria to aged or disabled individuals receiving SSI benefits for purposes of determining Medicaid

DESPACITO -“THIS IS HOW WE DO IT IN PUERTO RICO

Despacito, “this is how we do it in Puerto Rico.”  However, this was not the case when it came to Maria, it was a typical hit and run, but when applied to rebuilding it will definitely be despacito. To add insult to injury, the Rich Port has suffered two catastrophes, one man made the other a natural one. The man made job was of their own doing; spending money they didn’t have, living the dolce vita on other people’s money. The island of 3.5 million is dead broke, but the insult is Maria who with a splash literally through water on their parade. According to reports, Puerto Rico is without power – the grid is down – property owners are waking up to the fact that many have nothing left. In these types of situations, for instance Haiti, rebuilding doesn’t come swiftly, but over time. It will be every man for himself type of situation because life or death waits in the wings. Expect a mass migration of Puerto Ricans to the Big Apple, Miami and its suburbs.

In just 24 hours, Maria dumped almost 40 inches of rain on parts of Puerto Rico, where millions of residents won’t have power for months. Most of the island saw more than a foot of precipitation as Maria turned streets into raging rivers. Puerto Ricans might not get power back for four to six months, said Ricardo Ramos, the CEO of Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority. Puerto Rico has been through a long recession and is deeply in debt. Before the storm hit, the state-owned power grid was “a little bit old, mishandled and weak,” the governor said. “The system has been basically destroyed,” Ramos told CNN. He said hospitals and water systems will get priority power restoration

Do not be dismayed those who take flight, yes the airport is opening up for the flight to the mainland, will no doubt go on the dole. After all 50% are on the dole already. The average per capita income in Puerto Rico is $20,000. And don’t forget that only 1% had flood insurance and wind insurance covered only 40% of the casa grandes. You see, most Puerto Rican’s did not have insurance on their flimsy houses, nor did they have mortgages which would have necessitated it. Mold now is a prime concern as air conditioning which relies on electricity is a hope and prayer.  Perhaps Elon Musk will provide solar to those who’s houses are still standing! But Puerto Rico will eventually recover because You will rebuild their haciendas for free. The smell of stench emanating from the island will be with us for a long time.

We must add, to the good people of Puerto Rico who work, pay taxes, support their families, didn’t scam the government, our hearts go out to them. For no fault of their own their life is now in shambles. 

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Before Maria paid them a visit the island was sinking under humongous amounts of debt. Bankruptcy was the only way out, but in so doing the liberal judge screwed the (please click here to get a clear picture of the dire conditions that existed before the cane hit)primary bondholders of the power company. This was an advertisement that Puerto Rico was no longer open for business. The best boat to take now is let the island sink or swim. The vulture capitalists will then come to the rescue, but with life vests attached; that is guarantees that they will not suffer the ignominious defeat the power company bondholders suffered. Advice to President Trump, stay away from the Rich Port. No matter what you give, they will want more and more and more; that is because that is how they do it in Puerto Rico.

The island of Puerto Rico, a Caribbean Island, a seductive island, a welfare island. Puerto Rico is all of these. They are bankrupt, seeking relief from 123 billion dollars in debt; 3 million of their citizens have lived the good life on our dime. Their creditors have been fleeced. For the past thirty years the island’s people have sucked the economy dry by borrowing to the hilt. Now they don’t want to pay. Like Greeks who think it is right to scam their creditors THEY HAVE NO SHAME. One may ask where did the money go? Down the drain. The government payed people not to work, in fact 41% of the workers were government employees.

 

 

PUERTO RICO THE SOCIALIST PARADISE OF THE CARIBBEAN DROWNING IN DEBT

The Greek debacle has been the focus of late on its on again-off again debt restructuring, but that doesn’t mean that the troubles in Puerto Rico are playing second fiddle. Puerto Rico is on the hook for close to $100 billion. That is a boat load of pina coladas. SoBe Smooth Pina Colada Drink - 20-Fl. Oz. Bottles (Pack of 12)Just in case you haven’t been initiated in the Puerto Rico way of doing business we bring you their number one life saver, welfare and social security.  Puerto Rico is a disability fraud paradiseThe top 10 U.S. zip codes tied to people receiving disability benefits, nine are in Puerto Rico. Flag of Puerto Rico

The sharks are circling the waters in the hope of default if and when it happens. The rich island has a dark journey ahead, tourism is in the tank, the economy is in a perpetual depression, drugs are rampant and most of all the government will not do what needs to be done; cut bait.

But Puerto Rico is part of the United States and is a metaphor for liberal bastions like Illinois and Connecticut, both drowning  the sea of debt. Utmost on the minds of the Puerto Rican is not the rising sea levels, but their share of the islands IOU’s. By the way, in case you didn’t notice, Puerto Rico has a population similar to Connecticut, 3,5 million or simply put a debt of $22,000 for each of its citizens. And true to form the Commonwealth’s economy has slowly reached the point of no return being sucked down by a giant whirlpool, even Captain Nemo can’t save this one.Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne

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PUERTO RICO – “A GREEK TRAGEDY”

The island of Puerto Rico, a Caribbean Island, a seductive island, a welfare island. Puerto Rico is all of these. They are bankrupt, seeking relief from 123 billion dollars in debt; 3 million of their citizens have lived the good life on our dime. Their creditors have been fleeced. For the past thirty years the island’s people have sucked the economy dry by borrowing to the hilt. Now they don’t want to pay. Like Greeks who think it is right to scam their creditors THEY HAVE NO SHAME. One may ask where did the money go? Down the drain. The government payed people not to work, in fact 41% of the workers were government employees.

PUERTO RICO THE SOCIALIST PARADISE OF THE CARIBBEAN DROWNING IN DEBT

The Greek debacle has been the focus of late on its on again-off again debt restructuring, but that doesn’t mean that the troubles in Puerto Rico are playing second fiddle. Puerto Rico is on the hook for close to $100 billion. That is a boat load of pina coladas. SoBe Smooth Pina Colada Drink - 20-Fl. Oz. Bottles (Pack of 12)Just in case you haven’t been initiated in the Puerto Rico way of doing business we bring you their number one life saver, welfare and social security.  Puerto Rico is a disability fraud paradise. The top 10 U.S. zip codes tied to people receiving disability benefits, nine are in Puerto Rico. Flag of Puerto Rico

The sharks are circling the waters in the hope of default if and when it happens. The rich island has a dark journey ahead, tourism is in the tank, the economy is in a perpetual depression, drugs are rampant and most of all the government will not do what needs to be done; cut bait.

But Puerto Rico is part of the United States and is a metaphor for liberal bastions like Illinois and Connecticut, both drowning  the sea of debt. Utmost on the minds of the Puerto Rican is not the rising sea levels, but their share of the islands IOU’s. By the way, in case you didn’t notice, Puerto Rico has a population similar to Connecticut, 3,5 million or simply put a debt of $22,000 for each of its citizens. And true to form the Commonwealth’s economy has slowly reached the point of no return being sucked down by a giant whirlpool, even Captain Nemo can’t save this one.Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne

PUERTO RICO – A BASKET CASE – GOING DOWN LIKE AN EGYPTIAN JET

The numerous times we written about Puerto Rico one thing has been stressed: Puerto Rico is a WELFARE PARADISE. An island that has been on the dole for three or more decades. A Greece in hiding. But now the waves are slamming its shores. Financial waves slamming at the largesse of government. The time has come to cough up the loot. Puerto Rico like all deadbeats says, well you know what they have said, f…y.. This does not sit well with many of their creditors. They take exception at being treated with disdain.

But all is not lost yet, Uncle Sam is coming to the rescue with strings. Those strings seem to be tougher than the Puerto Rican enablers like. In true fashion, Burn-ee Sanders weighed in on the subject. He, is not taking the hot Puerto Rican sun lightly as he vehemently spilled out a diatribe on why we should pour more money into the parasitic island. Click here for Burn-ee’s invective.

The Vermont senator writes in a letter released Monday that the deal reached last week between the White House and House Republicans and Democrats would empower an “unelected and undemocratic oversight board” and allow the governor of Puerto Rico to slash the minimum wage to $4.25 an hour for up to five years.

As noted below, sometimes strings are attached.

Sanders warned that the control board would have the power to cut the budget, slash pensions and take other measures. He notes that most of the control board would be chosen by Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

HOP ABOARD THE PUERTO RICAN EXPRESS BEFORE IT LEAVES THE STATION

Without looking back, the parasites are leaving the island. (click) Bankrupt, Puerto Rico had no choice but to blackmail the United States Government, yeah Paul the Liberal Ryan, is bailing them out. The stinkers oh $75 Big Ones, that’s $75,000,000 (billion) gone up in smoke. You can’t make this stuff up. Three million people blew a whole wad of cash on living like the Greeks. And by the way, the Greeks are out of cash. They are coming back for more. Once a beggar, once a liar, you are always a beggar and liar.

Forget Obama, Ryan, McConnell, Boehner, give me a break. Send them to the other side of the moon. We do not want to hear from them again. “Finito

PR flag bill.jpg

From Fox News: The goal of legislation is to reduce the island’s debt burden before it defaults on a $2 billion debt payment due July 1. Earlier this month,Puerto Rico missed most of a $422 million payment.